Possible themes, speakers, organisers for the centennial of Rotary in New Zealand

 

These themes emerge from research by Stephen Clarke and two students on summer scholarships.  The aim is to make the most of the centennial of the founding of the Wellington and Auckland clubs in June 1921 by celebrating past achievements and linking history to current challenges. The nation-wide lock down in response to Covid19 has has parallels with experiences of founders of Rotary clubs in the 1920s. Those who founded Wellington and Auckland Rotary clubs in June 1921 had experienced the First World War which resulted in 17000 New Zealanders being killed and 41,000 wounded. In just six weeks between early November and mid December 1918, 8000 died from the influenza epidemic.

The New Zealand economy experienced a steep drop in export prices in early 1922 which led to the creation of the Dairy and Meat boards in efforts to stabilise those markets. New industries were encouraged by the establishment of the Forestry Service and Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, whose chief exceutives were members of Wellington Rotary. There was another major drop in export prices in 1927 and after 1929, export prices fell by 45% in two years, and national income fell by 40 percent in three years.  Wool prices fell by 60 percent from 1929-32. In 1939 New Zealanders then faced the Second World war. These events are summarised in https://nzhistory.govt.nz/culture/the-1920s

Rotary was a very successful start-up in the New Zealand of the 1920s, with 22 clubs established in every major centre of New Zealand between 1921 and 1928, with a total membership of about 1000 by the end of the decade.[1] Now Rotary has 8000 members in 230 clubs in most New Zealand communities.  The lock-down has prompted experiments with on-line meetings which now open possibilities for New Zealand wide engagement on some or many these topics.

These ideas were floated with the Wellington Club on March 3, 2020, a timing which can now be seen as B.C. (Before Covid). Details about possible themes, speakers and organisers have been developed since, working with the nearly complete centennial history.

Concept:

Monthly themed meetings at the Wellington club starting in the second half of 2021, running through 2022, marketed first as a 'season ticket' for members of the Rotary Club of Wellington and Rotary members throughout New Zealand. The Wellington club has an events organising and catering team which can provide organising support with events priced to cover costs. A variation of this format could be:

A mostly on-line speaker or panel, similar to Zoom sessions currently run by the Rotary Club of Wellington, which is timed to link with meeting times of as many Rotary clubs as possible. For some topics and speakers it might be possible to run repeat sessions, either videoed or run with speakers willing to do several sessions, eg Monday lunch, Tuesday early evening, Wednesday breakfast. If clubs are meeting in person, the video link might be 15-45 minutes in total, seeking a question from as many clubs as possible.


Format for events:

5 pm gathering for 5.30 pm formal start around tables in the large room. Use of tables to prompt people from different backgrounds to introduce each other, and avoid those who already know each other clustering together.

People will be encouraged to book for the full evening with dinner but there will be a $20 option for the first 90 minutes until 7 p.m. This early evening session will provide short talks on the theme and an overview from the main speaker/s. The general theme is of learning from the past to create the future, emphasising the Maori saying "Ka mua, ka muri" which is translated as meaning "walking backwards into the future".

Catering would be a buffet, with self-service starting at 7 p.m. The buffet will enable people from different tables to meet as they serve their own food, and will also reduce the cost of food and service.

The first 90 minutes will follow the typical format of a Rotary meeting:

  • Greetings and thoughts for the session, which is tailored for the theme. Welcome to special visitors reinforced with slides about who guests are and which tables they are at.
  • A perspective from history of the theme. Ideas from the 1920s and different periods of innovation in Rotary’s history. Use of archival films using the format of videos
  • Comments from non-Rotary guests from organisations founded / assisted. Presentations limited to 5 minutes.
  • A short introduction by the guest speaker of the input which will be expanded in a speech and discussion after the first course of dinner.
  • A ‘fining’ session which seeks to build a centennial fund with a combination of untagged and specified funds and ‘please follow up’ notes about legacies and larger sums.

7.45 p.m. approx. After dinner speaker/s about the theme. Allow for 20-30 minutes with 15 minutes for questions.

8.30 p.m. (Some sessions) Music from Wellington music schools which benefit from Roy McKenzie sponsored scholarships, or music from past winners of these scholarships.  With some themes, and outside organisations there will hopefully be displays where those interested can gain more information.

 

Possible themes, organisations and speakers

 

Theme

History, organisations supported, current developments

Possible speakers

Possible organisers

External audiences to invite

Arts, music, performance

Support for music scholarships, opera singers, visual arts.  Malvina Major foundation 1991, helped by New Plymouth West Rotary club. Singers to listen for - Wellington Rotary with Rodney McCann.  Annual music awards endowed by Roy McKenzie in Wellington.   

Culture and heritage policy changes - Te Papa / Ministry of Culture and Heritage / Heritage NZ.  An opera singer supported through these programmes?

John Boshier, organiser of singers to listen for. Geoff Dangerfield, chair of Festival of the Arts, Kerry Prendergast, previous chair of the festival.

Arts organisations and their members. NZ Opera, Symphony Orchestra, NZ Festival of the Arts. Past recipients of awards (if records available)

Child health

Truby King and Wellington Rotary’s commitment to fund the Karitane Hospital in 1921. Building opened 1927.  Support for childrens’ health camps, establishment of Harold Thomas Rotary trust, 1973. Creation of Cure Kids, the largest funder of child health research outside Government.

Link with current fundraising for the Wellington Children’s hospital.

 

A panel of those involved with the new children’s hospital, hopefully including major donor Mark Dunajtschik.  

Bill Day, Port Nicholson, fundraiser for Childrens’ Hospital. Rotary link with Cure Kids?

Plunket Society, child health organisations, medical specialists in the field.

Environment

Tree planting. Link with the founding of Forest and Bird in Wellington, 1923 and plantings by Paul Harris in the 1930s and Rotary Grove in the Auckland Domain. Karori Rotary and Wellington Rotary clubs as major contributors to the founding of the Karori Sanctuary, now  Zealandia. Trees for Survival in Auckland and Waikato; Roy McKenzie and Lambton Quay Trees and the Forest at the heart of Wellington.

Current tree planting initiatives, carbon neutrality analysis by Wellington Rotary, community facilities enabled by Rotary clubs. Formation of the nation-wide trust for plantings as part of the centennial. Possible panel about conservation, agriculture and the economy.

Alex Hare, RCW? Opus background, specialisation in environment?
Denise Church as past chair of Zealandia? Sarah Owen, manager of partnerships at Dept of Conservation, RCW member

Environment groups. Link with Forest and Bird and seek publicity through their magazine and membership (80,000 members I think).

Environment – creation of community facilities

A focus on significant community facilities funded recently by Rotary clubs, eg a $300,000 skate park at Marton, the Martinborough Fair and causes that has supported, Wellington’s Jumbo tennis and causes it has supported; Southland fundraising which had significant impact. 

A panel of project leaders who have raised funds.

Marton.

 

William Somerville and Jumbo Tennis

Link with members of the Fundraising institute. Local Rotary clubs to invite people who have supported projects with funds or in kind support.

Health and the general population

History of Rotary support for specialist health e.g. Polio vaccine, cancer, diabetes, TB association (started in New Plymouth). Current fundraising for vaccinations in the Pacific. Guests from organisations supported in this sector

Aim to invite Rotarians involved with health related fundraising, including for research.

 

 

International development and relief support

Origins of the Rotary Foundation and changing international support. Early support for Volunteer Service Abroad (VSA), links with Sir Edmund Hilary. Work of World Community Service, e.g. shelter boxes. Recent and current international support, including a further emphasis on vaccinations in the Pacific and emergency shelter boxes

Rotary centennial project for Give Every Child a Future as a major fundraising cause.

Christine Hurley – link with Auckland, Australia?

Invitations to MFAT and international agencies, embassies.

Marketing Rotary

How does an organisation of the industrial era rebrand itself for a digital era?  E.g. lessons from Student Volunteer Army, Sam Johnson and from national organisations such as SPCA, Plunket, CCS, and non profits which have met challenges of having consistency across the country.

A panel from voluntary organisations which have repositioned themselves and have a story about generational renewal.

 

 

Philanthropy

Legacy of the JR McKenzie and Roy McKenzie trusts, and the Todd Foundation. Guests from Philanthropy NZ and trusts. Roles of Rotary as a catalyst and supportive network for fundraising, and as a donor.

Future of philanthropy in NZ –Robyn Scott, CE of J R McKenzie Trust, possibly Jenny Gill, formerly Foundation North;

 

 

Social Enterprise

Support for self-sustaining enterprises, which Rotary networks have helped establish.  Wellington and Newmarket Rotary clubs have awards run with the Akina Foundation for social enterprise. 

Past recipients of social enterprise awards with updates? Overview of this sector and interest in ‘impact investment’? Possible speakers, panellists – James Palmer and Paul Gilberd, part of Christian Savings and Community Finance. 

Derek Gill – who else is actively engaged?

Andrew Miller from Team Talk, former Rotary member?

 

Akina Foundation, past award winners and entrants. Policy makers in this area, MBIE, Internal Affairs, Minister?

Vocation – changing nature of work

Comparing work and vocations of the 1920s with the impact of current technology change. In the 1920s new work was created by technologies such as automobile assembly, electricity, broadcasting, telephones.  Link with developments with the NZ Institute of Technology and initiatives by some Rotary clubs with apprenticeships, vocation support.

Minister of Tertiary Education, Chris Hipkins? Stephen Town as new CE for the Institute of Technology?

 

Nigel Gould, current Wellington Rotary member on experience chairing Tertiary Education Commission?

Education and training sectors – invitations to boards and senior managers of universities and member of the New Zealand Institute for skills and technology.

Vocation – engineering and science, with origins in the 1920s.

Ernest Marsden, first CE of the DSIR in 1926 was a founding member of Rotary in 1921. Update with examples from the Eureka speaking completion and scholarships for science. Invitations to those in science and engineering roles (particularly electricity which saw major growth in the 1920s).

New priorities of science and research post Covid – health and the economy?

Anthony Scott of Science NZ . Russ Ballard with experience of Eureka?

Invites to crown research institutes, science teachers in schools,

Vocation – public services dating from the 1920s

Rotary’s support from the 1920s for research based service. Initiatives of the 1920s and 1930s prior to the 1936 Labour Government and 1938 Social Security Act. Initiatives in social change such milk in schools, health, social welfare. Establishment in the late 1920s by Wellington Rotary of housing at Waterloo, a forerunner of state housing. Composition of Rotary Wellington in the 1920s and 1930s included prominent public servants.

A panel about the spirit of service goal for the new Public Service Act. How can government and community organisations work more effectively?

Geoff Dangerfield, experience with NZTA, Ministry of Economic Development. Roger Blakeley with central and local government experience.

Public servants and local authority councillors involved in delivering services through non profit sector organisations.

Vocation – the automobile industry and the role of Wellington companies in its development

Role of Charles Norwood and Dominion Motors as distributors of Morris cars; his role as Mayor and in gaining a major donation for CCS from Lord Nuffield in 1935. Todd family in motor car imports and assembly and energy from the 1920s. Colonial Motors (Gibbons family) and assembly of Ford cars in Courtenay Place, 1922. 

Business which was very significant for Wellington in the 1920s and 1930s, with families connected with Wellington Rotary.

Future cars – electric and short term hire (Mevo).  Backing of Meridian and Genesis for electric transport. Double decker electric buses used by Tranzit, Wairarapa family firm which is linked with Masterton South Rotary.

John Gibbons (Ford manufacturing and distributing Colonial Motor Company); George Fairburn, Automobile Association background

Invitation to members of the Todd and Gibbons families – Norwood family? Current motor distribution businesses?

Vocation – the Finance Sector then and now and into the future.

Role of finance organisations and Rotary membership in that field, e.g. Harold Beauchamp, father of Katherine Mansfield, as Rotary founder and chair of the Bank of New Zealand and Harbour Board. Strong connections with the Bank of New Zealand in the 1970s and 1980s.

Comparing and contrasting this sector and in Wellington the role of Reserve Bank in regulating the sector. Impact of technology and deregulation.

Check

 

Vocation: Education and scholarships for study abroad

History of support for scholarships at secondary and tertiary level. Examples of Bev Wakem and Denise Church and the impact of their US study experiences. A session focused on bringing together past and current recipients of such scholarships

Who in Rotary tracks careers of those who have benefited from scholarships?

 

 

Welfare and links with government agencies, both local and central

History of research by Rotary in the 1920s of poverty; contribution to the creation of health and welfare strategies, e.g. planning for houses in the Hutt Valley, distribution of milk in schools in Wellington city.  Continuation of this work through the Ilott Trust and JR McKenzie trust and equivalent trusts linked with other Rotary clubs.

Issues of equality and access to resources. Research supported by the JR McKenzie Trust into systems issues affecting poverty. What is / what should be the relationship between voluntary organisations and state provision?

 

Representatives from voluntary sector organisations, particularly those which rely to a significant extent on government funding. Invite government agencies delivering welfare services

Women and Rotary

First women admitted in the early 1990s - changing nature of Rotary leadership, trends in membership

More talks similar to those from Bev Wakem and Jenny Gill about changes from Rotary of pre 1990.

 

 

Youth

YMCA, Wellington, also Boys Brigade. A major focus of the 1920s. Auckland Rotary supported the Hunua Camp. The first Rotary meeting was at the YMCA, Willis Street in June 1921. Two secretaries, J L Hay and L Greenberg and the national secretary R Brasted were members of Wellington Rotary in the 1920s and 30s.

Where are YMCAs now? And similar youth organisations?

Tony Hassed, formerly chair of Wellington YMCA

Boards and members of the YMCA, Boys Institute and similar non profit organisations

Youth

Rotary’s own initiatives to attract younger members – success of Interact clubs in Auckland and relatively limited number of Rotaract clubs. How can membership organisations work in the era of Facebook, Linkedin, etc?

Link with a Rotary International or Australian example for Rotaract / Interact? Successful clubs in NZ as panellists

Iona and other members of Wellington Rotaract

Check with Tony Hassed and youth committee

 

 

Notable Rotarians from Wellington Rotary during the 1920s and 1930s. Many of these individuals will link with themes above.

 

A F Roberts, president 1921-23, managing director of wool brokers Murray Roberts Ltd, who became mayor of Lower Hutt in 1929, headed the New Zealand contribution for the 1924 London Empire Exhibition, and was director of New Zealand’s 1940 centennial exhibition.

Charles Odlin, president 1923-24, whose name lives on with the refurbished timber store near Te Papa, who was a major player in the timber industry.

W E Herbert, president, 1925-26, founder of Bowen Hospital, which was for many years on the corner of Bowen Street and The Terrace before building near Crofton Downs.

John Ilott, president 1929-30, who was a founder of the advertising industry in New Zealand and, with his son John a founder of philanthropy in New Zealand.

Charles Norwood, president 1933-34, Wellington Mayor, 1925-27, managing director of Dominion Motors, importers of Morris cars from Britain, and founder of the NZ Crippled Childrens’ Society.

William Gray Young, president 1935-36, noted architect, in particular designer of the Wellington Railway Station and Wellesley Club among many major buildings.

George Troup, Mayor of Wellington 1927-31, had a career with the Railways Department which included designing the Dunedin Railway Station. He was a key mover in the Kelburn tramway company, and responsible while on council for the establishment of a milk treatment station, the airport at Rongotai and the car tunnel through Mt Victoria.

 

Ernest Marsden, a founding member of Rotary when he was a professor of Physics at Victoria University, had worked with Ernest Rutherford in Britain and was the founding head of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research (DSIR) where he worked until 1954. The Marsden Research fund is named after him.

J R (John) McKenzie, founder of McKenzies the ‘variety’ store who established the JR McKenzie Trust in 1940, worked expanded by his son Roy McKenzie from the 1950s onwards.

Charles Todd, who joined Wellington Rotary in 1934, founder of Todd Motors which started with importing Chrysler cars in the 1930s.

Hope Gibbons, managing director of the Colonial Motor Company, assembler and distributors of Ford Motor cars, and initiator of two of the largest buildings of the 1920s, the seven storey assembly plant, the CMC building on Courtenay Place and the Hope Gibbons building on Taranaki Street.  

Sectors and occupations of members included:

Agriculture:

This was a period of initiatives to reduce the volatility of export prices. Members included the Agriculture Department Dairy Produce (control) board, Meat Producers, the Nestle and Anglo Swiss Milk company and many merchants in the primary sector.

Churches:

Clergy from Anglican and Presbyterian churches and a Jewish rabbi. YMCA general secretaries were members. 

Central Government.

This was a period when government’s role was expanded to respond to economic pressures and enable New Zealand to act increasingly independently from Britain.  Rotary members included the first head of the Forestry Department, L M Ellis;  the head of Public Works, F W Furkert;  head of Education, J Caughley;  head of External Affairs, J D Gray; Internal Affairs head, J Hislop;  Director General of Agriculture, C J Reake;  and National Librarian Guy Schofield.

Electricity

Electricity was a major growth sector with companies and government agencies and specialist engineers represented.  Among engineers was C W Salmon, founder of Cory Wright and Salmon.

Film

This was a fast-growing sector, with the Paramount and Embassy Theatres built in Courtenay Place. The general manager for NZ of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was a member in the 1930s.

Finance, banking and insurance

This sector has a significant number of members from banks and share broking and particularly insurance which had members from AMP, Commercial Union, Mutual Life and Citizens, National Mutual, names still visible in major buildings.

Local Government:

Four senior managers of Wellington city council, including two city engineers.

Hospitality;

The proprietor of the Midland Hotel, built in 1917 and demolished to create the Midland Park on Lambton Quay, was a member.

Law:

Partners and founders of these law firms were members: Baldwins, Buddle Anderson, Morrison and Co, Mazengarb, Hay and McCallister.

Manufacturing:

Wellington, and particularly Te Aro, was a centre of manufacturing including billiard tables, chocolate, iron foundries, cordial manufacturing, soap, candles, Match manufacturing, clothing, bricks, paper, tobacco, brushes, shirts, boots (R Hannah and Co)

Medical

Nearly 20 from medical professions, dentistry and chemists were members.

Merchants and retailing.

The single largest areas of work were in trade, often in agriculture and linked with the Port of Wellington.

Notable business names in addition to McKenzies included the Managing Director of Briscoes, M J Bridson, S Kirkcaldie, Managing Director of Kirkcaldie and Stains and the managing director of Whitcombe and Tombs, L Whitcombe and A P Smith, managing director of James Smiths Ltd.  Companies represented included A S Paterson and Co, Sargood Son and Ewen, Gordon and Gotch, Armstrong and Springhall,  Wright Stephenson, Stewart Dawson,  R E Tingey, Bristol Piano, Chas Begg and Co.

Motor industry:

More than 25 representatives of this fast growing industry were members, including the major manufacturers and distributors, Colonial Motors (Ford), Dominion Motors (Morris) and Todd (Chrysler). Petrol distributors, rubber manufacturers such as Dunlop and Firestone were based in the 1920s in Courtenay Place and Taranaki Street.

Shipping and Rail:

Senior managers of the Railway Department and the NZ Shipping Co, Shaw Saville and Albion and Holm and Co were members.

 

 

Organisations developed / supported by Rotary – 1921-2020, from four completed chapters of the history.

Highlighted topics are include in themes above.

 

Organisation

Theme

Chapter source

Aged care – Windsor House, ChCh, donated land from Ernest Adam, 1955

Age

2

Arts – founding of Malvina Major foundation 1991, launching helped by New Plymouth West Rotary club

Arts

3

Housing Planning of towns – Hutt valley settlement scheme, 150 houses by 1927. David Ewen, Rotary, Wellington president, later Mayor of L Hutt.

Civic

1

Hostel – Te Puna o Te Ora, Hamilton, 1938 – Maori hostel built

Civic

1

Maori Community centre, Freemans Bay Auckland, opened 1949

Civic

2

Art Gallery Invercargill funded 1966

Civic

2

Martinborough Fair – started by South Wairarapa Rotary 1977

Civic

3

Skate park - $300,000 raised by Marton Rotary, 2019

Civic

4

McKenzie Education fund 1938

Education

1

Defensive Driving supported by car manufacturers Norwood, Seabrook, Todd, 1967

Education

2

Outward Bound – Anakiwa purchase 1962. Woolf Fisher, Roy McKenzie as major donors, also David Levene

Education

2

Queen Victoria Maori Girls school  - major funding Auckland rotary 1971

Education

2

Study exchanges, youth exchanges

Education

2

Eureka speaking competition for science students, Wellington and other Rotary clubs from 2014 on

Education

4

Dictionaries for schools, 170,000 distributed in NZ and Pacific, Bill and Lorna Boyd Trust, Pakuranga Rotary, 2006 on

Education

4

National Science and Technology forum, annually in Auckland from the late 1980s. Auckland Rotary.

Education

4

Innovative Young Minds – to encourage young women to explore science, technology, engineering, mathematics, high tech manufacturing. Hutt City Rotary, 2017

Education

4

Cyber EQ-IQ from Invercargill East and She Can Code, Oamaru.

Education

4

Trees – 1932 Sydney Pascall, RI President, Dunedin Bot Gardens, Paul Harris with Auckland Rotary Grove

Environment

1

Environment – restoration of Deans Cottage at Deans Bush, ChCh 1950

Environment

2

Environment – albatross colony Otago Peninsula, 1950, Dunedin Rotary

Environment

2

Environment   -Roy McKenzie started planting in Lambton Qy Wellington late 1960s

Environment

2

Trees for survival – 1990 – school based growing and planting programmes, 100 schools in 2020. Rotary Club of Pakuranga, Bill Boyd

Environment

3

Zealandia – Karori Rotary and regional Rotary clubs as major backers in the 1990s

Environment

4

Tamaki River walkway – Pakuranga Rotary, 35 year project started in 1978, finished 2012. Pauatahanui walkway, Plimmerton Rotary, 2005

Environment

4

Forest at the heart of Wellington – 70,000 plants between 2011 and 2021 to give a centennial total since 1968 of 100,000 plants.

Environment

4

Plunket - Health  -Karitane Hospital underwrite, Wellington, 1921

Health

1

Crippled Childrens’ society 1935

Health

1

TB association, 1941 New Plymouth

Health

1

University research endow a chair of obstetrics and gynaecology, Auckland 1943

Health

1

Child health camps

Health

2

Blood transfusion, mogile unit early 1950s Wellington and PEtone

Health

2

Asthma and Respiratory Foundation, started in Hutt Valley, 1964

Health

2

Child Health – Harold Thomas rotary trust for medical research and treatment, Pacific, founded 1973

Health

2

Child health – founding of National Childrens’ health research foundation, 1972. Led to Cure Kids, the largest funder of child health research outside govt.

Health

2

Diabetes research  - Uni of Auckland  - 1980s Remuera Rotary

Health

3

Health – Kidney Health NZ, Terrace End Rotary, Palmerston North 1979

Health

3

Health – hospice establishment 1970s and 1980s

Health

3

Reaching out – intermediate school children at risk of substance abuse, Also Drug Abuse Resistance Education, DARE and Life Education Trust, 1988. Became the Child Development Foundation 1992

Health

3

Healthy heroes, Wellington North-  eating habits, 2004

Health

4

Rotary world community service  - emergency kits for the Pacific started by Eastern Hutt, 1983. Water and sanitation projects, responses to disasters. More than $23 million in grants

International

3

Polio eradication – internationally from 1980

International

3

Peace studies: Centres for International studies in peace and conflict – Brisbane as nearest – who has a record of those who have attended?

Peace

4

United Nations – part of San Francisco conference 1945. Annual Rotary day at the UN

Peace

1

McKenzie Trust 2020

Philanthropy

1

Abilities Inc, founded 1959, result of June Opie making a please to the Rotary conference 1959., Followed by Papanui club establishing Abilities ChCh. Abilities employs 140

Vocation

2

Social enterprise funding in association with the Akina Foundation Wellington and Newmarket Rotary clubs, 2015 on

Vocation

4

Blind Institute Parnell – major 1920s fundraising

Welfare

1

Heritage NZ for sons and daughters of deceased servicemen

Welfare

1

Milk in Schools – 1920s Mt Cook school and one in Auckland, forerunners of the govt programme

Welfare

1

Birthright, 1950, working with solo parents

Welfare

2

YMCA – boys activities as a Wellington priority in the 1920s, venue for first Wellington Rotary meeting at the YMCA Willis Street. Auckaldn support for Hunua camp,

Youth

1

Sargood Trust, 1939, children and young people

Youth

1

Boy Scouts – 1920s support

Youth

1

TocH

Youth

1

ChCH Chrighton CObbers club founded by TocH

Youth

1

YMCA Auckland – fundraising 1953

Youth

2

Riding for the disabled – 1972, Tom Atchison

Youth

3

Rotary Youth Leadership Awards more than 80 clubs by 1982

Youth

3

Youthtown, a renamed boys town, Auckland 1994

Youth

3

 

 

[1] 1921 - Wellington, Auckland; 1922 – Christchurch; 1923 Dunedin, Hamilton; 1924: Invercargill, Whanganui, Napier, Hastings, Palmerston North;  1925: Hawera, New Plymouth, Oamaru, Whangarei; 1926: Gisborne; 1927: Blenheim, Nelson, Gore, Dannevirke, Rotorua, Timaru; 1928: Thames

 

Possible themes, speakers, organisers for the centennial of Rotary in New Zealand

 
 
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